Craig Taylor

Editions

Details

Pages

448

Size

13 × 20 cm

Published

2009

ISBN

9781847083296

More

One Million Tiny Plays About Britain

One Million Tiny Plays is a never-ending project. 97 of the plays are collected in this volume.

In these snippets of overheard conversations from across the length and breadth of the country, Craig Taylor captures the state we're in with humour and pathos and perfect timing. Laugh-out-loud funny, and sometimes heartbreakingly moving, these tiny plays in which every one of us could have a starring role are little windows into other people's lives that reveal the triumphs, disasters, prejudices, horrors and joys of twenty-first-century life.

A list of professional productions.

A list of amateur productions.

From the author

The story behind the book.

Reviews

“When these miniature plays first started to appear in the Guardian, I thought that they were snippets of dialogue snatched from real life. Then I began to see that I'd been beguiled by Craig Taylor's craft -- like the best playwrights, his characters have independent and spontaneous lives of their own contained within a carefully constructed dramatic architecture. Within his little worlds we see glimpses of the oddness, the quiet desperation, and the occasional tenderness of the lives of others. The plays are an original form: dramatic haikus. The fact that they're so short merely emphasizes the skill with which they've been put together. They're a wonderful keyhole through which you can peer at contemporary Britain.”

—Richard Eyre

“Taylor's plays are acutely observed, exquisitely crafted tragicomedies, rooted in bitter or absurd truths. Through their tiny aperture they provide a detailed picture that sparks an all-important jolt of recognition which is, by turns, comical, satisfying and highly discomforting. They take all of one minute to read, but will make you think for a great deal longer”

—Sunday Telegraph

“Highly polished, beautifully capturing the absurdities, pretensions, joys and poignancies of life in contemporary Britain.”

—London Review of Books